Financial statements and key figures

OeNB records operating profit of EUR 753 million

In 2015, the OeNB's operating profit before writedowns and transfers went up by EUR 360 million to EUR 1,171 million against the previous year. This increase was primarily attributable to a significant rise in income from equity shares and participating interests. Following an allocation of EUR 350 million to risk provisions and writedowns on foreign currency assets and securities totaling EUR 69 million, the operating profit for 2015 came to EUR 753 million. After taxes and dividends – namely EUR 188 million of corporate income tax plus the 90% share of profit due to the central government (pursuant to the Federal Act on the Oesterreichische Nationalbank) in the amount of EUR 508 million – the profit for the year 2015 came to EUR 56 million. The OeNB’s net currency position decreased to EUR 14.3 billion, owing to risk-reducing hedging transactions in the amount of -EUR 5.1 billion among other factors. Gold and gold receivables accounted for EUR 8.8 billion of the net currency position.

OeNB indicators over the past five years  
  2015 2014 2013 2012 2011
 
                                                                                                EUR million
Net currency position 14,324 18,531 13,430 18,142 17,276
   of which gold and gold receivables 8,761 8,892 7,843 11,353 10,954
Banknotes in circulation 27,795 26,237 24,497 23,298 22,687
Total assets 106,987 92,827 97,485 109,369 99,348
Operating profit excluding selected items 1,171 811 662 988 638
 
Staff costs 142 139 136 131 125
Administrative expenses 85 84 82 84 79
Operating profit 753 341 298 377 249
Corporate income tax 188 85 75 94 62
Transfer to the pension reserve   − 22  −
Central government’s share of profit 508 230 181 255 168
Profit for the year 56 26 20 28 19
 
Staff in full-time equivalents (FTEs)1 1,229.2 1,234.8 1,232.9 1,222.4 1,146.0
   staff employed in core business areas1, 2 1,085.9 1,084.0 1,089.1 1,071.7 985.7
 

Comment

The OeNB has been an integral part of the European System of Central Banks since January 1, 1999. For definitions of the individual balance sheet items, see Annex IV of the ECB’s accounting guideline (link provided under General information).

The current accounting format differs from the format on which the financial statements used to be based before 1999; therefore, it is not possible to make meaningful comparisons.

Discrepancies may arise from rounding.